We have moved – The Weatherhead Project

The Weatherhead Project

The Weatherhead Project is our story in building a home and a family. After building, renovating and turning this little shack into a home, The Weatherhead’s are embarking on a new project. You can read about our adventures at www.theweatherheadproject.com

For the last 11 years, The Box has been our home. We moved in as broke newlyweds, we started careers, we renovated, we collected belongings, we started a family. This is where we became “grown ups”, where we figured out who we were together, as a young married couple, and as a young family.

The Weatherheads are moving to the Byron Bay hinterland. We plan to find another ugly shack on a stunning piece of land, and will spend the next stage of our lives fixing it up, making it ours, and letting our kids roam free. It will be difficult and messy and simple and beautiful, and we are equal measures of terrified and excited.

We want to have a view – of wide open space, of the far away horizon. There are lots of properties we’ve seen that have beautiful views of forest, or bushlands, or of orchards. But we want to look out the windows and see sky, rolling hills as far as the eye can see, and hopefully a little bit of ocean in the far distance.

Oh, what an adventure we are about to begin!

Moose Art

Just a quick one today to share some Etsy love.

I bought these goodies recently from Moose Art, an awesome little Etsy store. 4 different rolls of fabric tape, sweet little designs. This stuff is really good value, as you really only use a little bit at a time, so it goes a long way.

I loved the packaging that my goodies arrived in – not too fancy, but a sweet, personal touch. It’s the little things that make certain sellers stand out, that little extra bit of effort that makes you remember them.

FYI: we weren’t paid to promote this Etsy seller, I just randomly found them and decided to purchase their products.

 

A woman’s legacy

Daniel’s aunt passed away early last year. Margaret was a lovely, kind, gentle, generous woman, who was beloved by all who knew her. She had the single most positive, sunny disposition I have ever had the pleasure of knowing.

After Margaret’s passing, her family graciously and generously gave me her sewing machine. It is a beautiful old machine: solid, sturdy, dependable. I believe she bought it when she was first married 50 years ago.

 

 

Margaret was of that generation of women who were the daughters of WW2: practical, down to earth, creative, and with so generous a spirit that no one in their circle of acquaintance went without in times of need.

These women were taught home-keeping skills by their own mothers, grandmothers, aunts and sisters; skills which usually included some form of craft – sewing, needlework, knitting, crochet. Except that, to these women, it wasn’t a “craft” as we think of it today. It was a necessity. You learned to sew because sometimes you had to make or mend your own clothes or home furnishings. You learned to knit or crochet a blanket because you needed to keep your children warm. Their first thought wasn’t always to run down to the store to buy the new thing you needed; their first thought was often to try to make it themselves.

 

 

In my generation of women, it’s less common that we were taught these skills by our elders. Over time, it has become less of a necessity to be able to make or mend our own things, and more of a fad or a hobby – for enjoyment rather than for need. We have the luxury of sewing, knitting or stitching for fun, and even (thanks to Etsy and a growing trend in community markets) for profit.

I did learn some basic sewing skills as a younger girl from my own mother. And she did try to teach me how to knit (the fault was with the student, not the teacher). But as an adult, I taught myself to knit by watching youtube clips. I’ve taught myself to sew by reading various blogs and following their online tutorials.

 

 

It might seem a little distant, a little sad, that it wasn’t my mother or grandmother who taught me. But it doesn’t mean that we’ve missed out on that heritage. It was the women of Margaret’s generation that taught those next in line how to craft. And it was those women who passed it on to the next. And so on. Until someone filmed themselves teaching a hypothetical someone else, and posted it on youtube. There are countless women bloggers out there who put tutorials online, for free, for the sole purpose of teaching others. We have an almost infinite ability to learn new skills and techniques from complete strangers, from all over the world.

It’s this spirit of sharing and generosity that we continue to inherit – offering our skills and expertise to other women, openly, and with a genuine passion to see others learn new ways to be creative and to love it.

Margaret’s generation, and the generations before them, have given us a legacy. They have passed down to us a wealth of knowledge, a passion for crafting, and a wonderful way to express ourselves creatively.

 

 

So when I sit at my sewing table, and I pass fabric through the feed dogs of Margaret’s old sewing machine, and I hear the gentle whir of the needle, I think of her. And I hope she sees the love I stitch into every seam. I hope she likes that I try to sew more often for others than for myself. And I hope she smiles at the increasing confidence and joy I feel as I teach myself these womanly skills, and become a part of the legacy of her generation.

Washi tape pegs

I frequently see fancy wooden pegs at local markets and online Etsy stores, and they’re quite lovely.

From Pinterest

From Pinterest

Something so simple that can be used in so many ways. Great for decorating, hanging art, wrapping gifts, anything.

From Pinterest

They’re usually made by glueing fabric or paper to the side of the peg. But being the lazy crafter that I am, I decided to use washi tape. No glueing, just stick it right on there. Oh, and the pegs are just from the supermarket.

Once it is stuck on nice and smooth, I just use a sharp blade on my cutting mat to take off any excess from the sides.

This is quite literally the fastest crafting project I have ever attempted. Awesome.

Washi tape pegs

I frequently see fancy wooden pegs at local markets and online Etsy stores, and they’re quite lovely.

From Pinterest

From Pinterest

Something so simple that can be used in so many ways. Great for decorating, hanging art, wrapping gifts, anything.

From Pinterest

They’re usually made by glueing fabric or paper to the side of the peg. But being the lazy crafter that I am, I decided to use washi tape. No glueing, just stick it right on there. Oh, and the pegs are just from the supermarket.

Once it is stuck on nice and smooth, I just use a sharp blade on my cutting mat to take off any excess from the sides.

This is quite literally the fastest crafting project I have ever attempted. Awesome.

Crafting station

As I mentioned previously (at the end of this post), our little Widg has been frequently asking to join me lately when I am crafting. I’m really happy that he’s interested in this type of thing, and I want to encourage him to be creative, to use his hands, to figure out how things work. I also like the idea that he has learned that it is just as much fun being relatively still at a table and making/drawing/painting as it is to run around in the garden or zoom his cars up and down his parking garage.

I decided that I wanted the ability to be more spontaneous with my creative stuff, instead of “it’s too much effort to get it all out and set it up so I won’t bother”. We rarely use our dining table to actually dine at (lazy weekend breakfasts only – the rest of our meals we eat sitting on the couch at the coffee table. Shocking, I know.). So I thought I would keep a small set of crafting goodies at the dining table – this means that the Widg and I can get our craft on whenever the whim takes us.

 

It also means that it’s all there, ready to go – as a quick distraction for the Widg when I am trying to get dinner cooked (our dining table is literally right next to the kitchen bench), or when the husband is trying to get some work done on the laptop.

Our dining table has, as a result, become a more communal gathering area for our small family. Sometimes we are all playing play-doh together, sometimes we’re each doing our own thing. It’s quite sweet (you can gag now if you like).

Crafting station

As I mentioned previously (at the end of this post), our little Widg has been frequently asking to join me lately when I am crafting. I’m really happy that he’s interested in this type of thing, and I want to encourage him to be creative, to use his hands, to figure out how things work. I also like the idea that he has learned that it is just as much fun being relatively still at a table and making/drawing/painting as it is to run around in the garden or zoom his cars up and down his parking garage.

I decided that I wanted the ability to be more spontaneous with my creative stuff, instead of “it’s too much effort to get it all out and set it up so I won’t bother”. We rarely use our dining table to actually dine at (lazy weekend breakfasts only – the rest of our meals we eat sitting on the couch at the coffee table. Shocking, I know.). So I thought I would keep a small set of crafting goodies at the dining table – this means that the Widg and I can get our craft on whenever the whim takes us.

 

It also means that it’s all there, ready to go – as a quick distraction for the Widg when I am trying to get dinner cooked (our dining table is literally right next to the kitchen bench), or when the husband is trying to get some work done on the laptop.

Our dining table has, as a result, become a more communal gathering area for our small family. Sometimes we are all playing play-doh together, sometimes we’re each doing our own thing. It’s quite sweet (you can gag now if you like).

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